Wednesday, September 30, 2015

A Visit to City of Rocks State Park


Have you ever seen a little piece of nature that seems completely different from the area around it? Maybe a fern-filled grotto around a spring in the desert? Or a wildflower meadow in the center of a dense forest? Enchanted places?

Not far from Silver City, New Mexico, we found such a place in City of Rocks State Park. In the middle of a rolling grassy plain, an ancient volcano left behind a core of hard rock that had eroded and weathered into what looks like a city on the hill. 

 


It's easy to imagine a thriving city, magically turned to stone. Like all cities, it has streets and alleys, windows and doors.

It's nicely landscaped, with wildflowers, 
live oaks, and desert plants.








Rock City has quite a few permanent residents, although they are a little camera shy.














Weathered rocks are a little like cloud formations, stimulating the imagination. If I stare at them for very long, I begin to see things there. Like stone castles…




Giant toadstools,

and petrified monsters.




The best part of this park is that the campsites are nestled right into the rocks, making visitors a part of this enchanted city. And right in the middle, under the wide-open sky, are a small observatory and meeting circle where they offer occasional programs on astronomy.



So, if you ever find yourself in western New Mexico (The Land of Enchantment), you might want to take time to explore this odd little park, and see what enchantments you find there. 



5 comments:

  1. The best part of this park is that the campsites are nestled right into the rocks, making visitors a part of this enchanted city. And right in the middle, under the wide-open sky, are a small observatory and meeting circle where they offer occasional programs on astronomy.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The best part of this park is that the campsites are nestled right into the rocks, making visitors a part of this enchanted city. And right in the middle, under the wide-open sky, are a small observatory and meeting circle where they offer occasional programs on astronomy.


    Carpenter

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi. Shawn. Thanks for dropping by.

      Delete
  3. Beautiful pictures, would love to see it in person some day... thanks for sharing :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks for dropping in. I'd never heard of it before last week, but thoroughly enjoyed it.

    ReplyDelete